What Your Child’s Sleeping Habits May Be Telling You

It’s easy to misinterpret certain types of sleep behavior in children as simple signs of deep sleep or dreaming. A little snoring or minor limb movement on occasion are certainly nothing to worry about, but when your child begins to snore chronically, breathe irregularly, or thrash physically during sleep, it may be time to consider whether or not he or she might have some form of sleep disordered breathing.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is one of the most common forms of sleep disordered breathing in adults, but children can also suffer from it – especially when there are other contributing factors present like excessive weight, chronic allergies, or specific jaw and bite alignment issues. Unfortunately all of these conditions can be intricately interrelated, sometimes making it difficult for a parent and a medical provider to successfully treat the OSA completely without addressing multiple factors at once.

What makes OSA so serious for both children and adults is that in its most severe form, it can be fatal. Thankfully, those cases are still extremely rare. However, medical research is now demonstrating that OSA and other types of sleep disorders in children and adults can manifest daytime symptoms that mimic mild to moderate forms of ADD and ADHD. Mistreating these cases with ADHD medication (typically stimulants) is dangerous on two levels: Your child could potentially be taking medication he or she does not need; and he or she could still have an underlying sleep disorder that remains unaddressed and potentially even exacerbated by the medication. 1

This month, I’ve added a new resource to The Airway Series that expands and explains these important issues in discovering and treating breathing and airway development issues in children. It is my hope that eventually all children will be screened for the underlying conditions that can lead to OSA, and that preventive measures like functional orthodontic treatment, healthy eating, and plenty of exercise are pursued before the pathological conditions related to OSA ever have a chance to develop.

As always, I encourage you to share this material as much as possible with your friends and family, and to bring any questions you may have about your own children with you to your next regularly scheduled appointment.

Martha (Signature)