Exercise, Nutrition, and Your Teeth

Exercise and a healthy diet are the cornerstones of a healthy lifestyle. But being healthy is about much more than simply looking slim and fit. Many very athletic adults and teenagers believe that their boosted metabolisms allow them to eat pretty much anything they want to so long as they continue to look slim and fit. But the consequences of a poorly constructed diet on the internal systems of your body, on your teeth, and even on your athletic performance, are the same regardless of how much you weigh or how healthy you may appear on the outside.

A diet filled with excessive amounts of highly refined sugar and grains, as well as foods and beverages that are high in acid, can have equally negative effects on the teeth and bodies of extremely active people as they do on sedentary individuals over time. And when it comes specifically to the teeth, very active individuals may actually be at a higher risk of tooth decay when consuming sugary or acidic foods and beverages during workouts in order to stay fueled and hydrated.

A quick burst of energy from a gel, sports beverage, or even a candy bar, may be exactly what you need to push you through the last leg of your athletic performance or training session, but that quick energy generally comes from a highly-concentrated combination of simple sugars and caffeine. Citric acid, and other acidic flavor enhancers, are often in the mix as well. Sugar and acid in the mouth create the perfect environment for cavity-causing bacteria to multiply and thrive. And introducing these elements into the mouth during intense exercise, when the saliva flow is often compromised, leaves your teeth even more vulnerable to these bacteria and accelerated tooth decay.

Certainly, there are many preventive measures that we can all take before, during, and after exercise to help protect our teeth and our bodies from the negative effects of the concentrated forms of sugar and acid we might consume during a workout. Our newest resource article, entitled Oral Health for Athletes, outlines several adjustments you can make the way you care for you teeth and fuel your body during a workout or race in order to better protect your teeth from accelerated decay.

For everyone, regardless of your level of athleticism, the first and best preventive measure you can take in protecting the health of your teeth and your body is to eat a well-balanced diet low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, and filled with plenty of whole fruits and vegetables, lean sources of protein, some whole grains, and moderate amounts of healthy fats. A strong metabolism should never be an excuse to regularly offer your body inferior sources of nutrition. No matter how athletic any of us may aspire to be, we should all be practicing healthy dietary choices every day and teaching our children that eating well isn’t just about protecting our health today or fueling an athletic performance next week – it’s about building and maintaining a healthy foundation for a vibrant and active lifestyle for years to come.

Martha (Signature)